Integrated Publishing Toolkit(IPT)

free and open access to biodiversity data

abatista

Latest version published by Check List on May 13, 2019 Check List

We set 14 transects along the city, 100 m long each, and used active visual search to find Anolis sagrei (5 m/min.) in Panama City, Panama and are surrounded by high traffic roads and buildings. All the specimens found were georeferenced in WGS 1984 datum

Downloads

Download the latest version of the metadata-only resource metadata as EML or RTF:

Metadata as an EML file download in English (13 KB)
Metadata as an RTF file download in English (10 KB)

Versions

The table below shows only published versions of the resource that are publicly accessible.

How to cite

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

Abel Batista1, Marcos Ponce, Orlando Garcés, Elliot Lassiter, Madian Miranda. 2019. Silent pirates: Anolis sagrei Duméril & Bibron, 1837 (Squamata, Dactyloidae) taking over Panama City, Panama. Checklist

Rights

Researchers should respect the following rights statement:

The publisher and rights holder of this work is Check List. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) 4.0 License.

GBIF Registration

This resource has not been registered with GBIF

Keywords

Occurrence; Alien species; invasive species; new country record; Observation; Alien species; invasive species; new country record

Contacts

Who created the resource:

Abel Batista
Researcher
Universidad Autónoma de Chiriquí Universidad Autónoma de Chiriquí (UNACHI), Vicerrectoría de investigación y Postgrado – Museo de Historia Natural, Ciudad Universitaria El Cabrero David, Chiriquí, 427, Panamá 427 David Chiriquí PA +507 69699742
https://www.losnaturalistas.com/english/

Who can answer questions about the resource:

Abel Batista
Researcher
Universidad Autónoma de Chiriquí Universidad Autónoma de Chiriquí (UNACHI), Vicerrectoría de investigación y Postgrado – Museo de Historia Natural, Ciudad Universitaria El Cabrero David, Chiriquí, 427, Panamá. 427 David Chiriquí PA +507 69699742
https://www.losnaturalistas.com/english/

Who filled in the metadata:

Abel Batista
Researcher
Universidad Autónoma de Chiriquí Universidad Autónoma de Chiriquí (UNACHI), Vicerrectoría de investigación y Postgrado – Museo de Historia Natural, Ciudad Universitaria El Cabrero David, Chiriquí, 427, Panamá. 427 David Chiriquí PA +507 69699742
https://www.losnaturalistas.com/english/

Who else was associated with the resource:

User
Abel Batista
Researcher
Universidad Autónoma de Chiriquí 1Universidad Autónoma de Chiriquí (UNACHI), Vicerrectoría de investigación y Postgrado – Museo de Historia Natural, Ciudad Universitaria El Cabrero David, Chiriquí, 427, Panamá. 427 David Chiriquí PA +507 69699742
https://www.losnaturalistas.com/english/

Geographic Coverage

All surveyed areas are within Panama City and are surrounded by high traffic roads and buildings.

Bounding Coordinates South West [-90, -180], North East [90, -180]

Taxonomic Coverage

We identified Anolis sagrei based on the set of diagnostic characters proposed by Köhler (2008). This is composed of compressed tail, orange to red dewlap with a yellow margin and scales and enlarged post-anals. Sebastian Lotzkat confirmed the species identification.

Species  Anolis sagrei (Brown Anole)

Temporal Coverage

Start Date 2018-03-26

Project Data

Anolis sagrei Duméril & Bibron, 1837 is one of the most widespread reptiles in the world, having colonized more than 15 countries on two continents. It inhabits open areas and is commonly found around big cities. We noticed the presence of an unreported, nonnative population in Panama City, Panama, which has been established since at least five years. We report Anolis sagrei for the first time in Panama based on collected specimens. We argue that the species is currently abundant in some areas and it could be a threat for native species

Title Title. Silent pirates: Anolis sagrei Duméril & Bibron, 1837 (Squamata, Dactyloidae) taking over Panama City, Panama.
Identifier Sebastian Lotzkat
Funding Secretaría Nacional de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación (SENACYT), tel (507) 517-0014, info@senacyt.gob.pa, Edificio 205, Ciudad del Saber, Clayto, Apartado: 0816-02852, Panamá, República de Panamá.
Study Area Description All surveyed areas are within Panama City and are surrounded by high traffic roads and buildings. All the specimens found were georeferenced in WGS 1984 datum.
Design Description On March 26th 2018, we received a photograph from the Director of the Audubon Society Panama, R. Miro, of an anole near the Panama Railway Company at Albrook (Fig. 1; 8.9699°N; 79.5622°W). The photo showed a courting pair of anoles in the border of a planter of ornamental ferns (Fig. 2A). A month later we received another photo from an ornithologist, R. Jordan, of an anole from 50th Street, downtown Panama City (8.9805°N; 79.5209°W), one of the most used roads in the city (Fig. 1–2). We went to those locations and confirmed the presence of the non-native Anolis sagrei. The only vegetation available to the lizards were small patches of gardens and scattered trees (Fig. 2). We set 14 transects along the city, 100 m long each, and used active visual search to find anoles (5 m/min.). All surveyed areas are within Panama City and are surrounded by high traffic roads and buildings. All the specimens found were georeferenced in WGS 1984 datum. The A distribution was created using QGIS (QGIS, 2018) with an OSM layer (OSM contributors 2015).

The personnel involved in the project:

Sampling Methods

We set 14 transects along the city, 100 m long each, and used active visual search to find anoles (5 m/min.).

Study Extent Panama City, Panama
Quality Control We identified A. sagrei based on the set of diagnostic characters proposed by Köhler (2008). This is composed of compressed tail, orange to red dewlap with a yellow margin and scales and enlarged post-anals. Sebastian Lotzkat confirmed the species identification.

Method step description:

  1. The species may have been unnoticed in Panama City, because it can easily be confused with the native A. gaigei (C. Jaramillo Pers. Comm.). Distinguishing the species mainly relies on the smaller dewlap with a yellow margin (see Figs. 3 C-D in Köhler et al., 2012:), and compressed tail in A. sagrei (Köhler, 2008; see Figs. 4F and 7C-D in Köhler et al., 2012). Anolis sagrei also often occupies open and urbanized areas and shows behavioral repertoires that are not observed in A. gaigei, such as aggressive responses of males to approaching males or even females. Anolis gaigei is more secretive and it is mainly found in low semideciduous forests and bushy savannahs, usually on trees or fences enclosing cattle pastures.

Collection Data

Collection Name Museo Herpetológico de Chiriquí
Collection Identifier MHCH
Specimen preservation methods Alcohol

Additional Metadata

Alternative Identifiers http://ipt.pensoft.net/resource?r=abatista