first_glossophaginae_corrientes_argentina

Latest version published by Check List on Sep 2, 2020 Check List

We report the discovery of the nectarivorous bat, Glossophaga soricina,in Corrientes, Argentina, extending its known range and increasing the number of bat species recorded in this province to 32.

An adult male was captured in Apipé Grande island in October 2019.

This bat is considered Vulnerable in Argentina and needs urgent conservation action in order to avoid further threats.

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Collett M (2020): first_glossophaginae_corrientes_argentina. v1.0. Check List. Dataset/Occurrence. http://ipt.pensoft.net/resource?r=first_glossophaginae_corrientes_argentina&v=1.0

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Keywords

Distribution; Nectarivorous bat; Neotropics

Contacts

Who created the resource:

Miranda Collett
Researcher
Collett Trust for Endangered Species Reserva Don Luis 3302 Ituzaingo Corrientes AR +5493786615664
https://www.collett-trust.org

Who can answer questions about the resource:

Miranda Collett
Researcher
Collett Trust for Endangered Species Reserva Don Luis 3302 Ituzaingo Corrientes AR +5493786615664
https://www.collett-trust.org
Melisa D'Occhio
Departamento de Ambiente y Turismo
Universidad Nacional de Avellaneda Espana 350 1870 Avellaneda Buenos Aires AR

Who filled in the metadata:

Miranda Collett
Researcher
Collett Trust for Endangered Species Reserva Don Luis 3302 Ituzaingo Corrientes AR +5493786615664
https://www.collett-trust.org

Who else was associated with the resource:

Miranda Collett
Researcher
Collett Trust for Endangered Species Reserva Don Luis 3302 Ituzaingo Corrientes AR +5493786615664
https://www.collett-trust.org

Geographic Coverage

La Casona Ecolodge, Isla Apipe Grande, Corrientes, Argentina

Bounding Coordinates South West [0, 0], North East [27, 56]

Taxonomic Coverage

Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae: glossophaginae: Glossophaga soricina The bat was identified to species

Species  Glossophaga soricina (Pallas's Long-tongued Bat)

Temporal Coverage

Start Date 2019-10-15

Project Data

Pallas’s Long-tongued Bat, Glossophaga soricina (Pallas, 1766), has a large range, covering much of the Neotropics. Until this study, Argentine records for this species were restricted to Misiones, Chaco, Salta, Jujuy and unverifiable records from Buenos Aires. We report the discovery of this nectarivorous bat in Corrientes, extending its known range and increasing the number of bat species recorded in this province to 32. An adult male was captured in Apipé Grande island in October 2019. This bat is considered Vulnerable in Argentina and needs urgent conservation action in order to avoid further threats.

Title First record of Glossophaga soricina (Pallas, 1766) (Chiroptera, Phyllostomidae) in the province of Corrientes, Argentina
Identifier bats_Corrientes
Funding Collett Trust for Endangered Species provided all the funding for the project
Study Area Description La Casona Ecolodge, San Antonio, Apipé Grande island, which is located in the River Paraná, between Argentina and Paraguay. 27.5075°S, 056.7444°W
Design Description An important project for our organisation is the study of bats. We have a team of trained bat handlers with good identification skills that conduct research in Argentina, in particular in Corrientes and Misiones. There is little known about the chiroptera species of this country, especially in the northeast, so our team conduct research in this area to discover which species can be found in particular locations. We use ultra fine mist nets and Harp traps (to capture bats and release them unharmed) as well as echolocation in order to identify the species. We follow the bat handling protocol of the UK, and do not kill any bat for research.

The personnel involved in the project:

Sampling Methods

We used a variety of mist nets placed in open spaces and close to fruiting trees to increase the probability of captures and to ensure a better representation of the local bat diversity. Nets were ultrafine (Eco-tone, Poland), designed specifically for catching small bats, and we used three sizes: a triple high net (12 × 7.2 m), a double high net (9 × 4.8 m) and a single net (12 × 2.4 m). They were opened after sunset at 19:20 local time on 15 October 2019, and the session lasted for four hours. Nets were checked every 15 minutes to minimize distress on captured bats. Individuals were weighed, measured and photographed and then released after minimal handling.

Study Extent La Casona, San Antonio, Apipe Grande Island, Corrientes, Argentina. Sampled twice annually
Quality Control Measurements, photographs and recordings of echolocations (where appropriate) used. All researchers have received extensive training in handling and identifying bats from this area.

Method step description:

  1. We used a variety of mist nets for this study. Bats were extracted from the nets and transferred to cotton bags. They were then processed by an experienced bat handler and handling was kept to a minimum. Bats were weighted, measured, photographed and we recorded the echolocation of the insectivorous bats on release. Handling was in accordance with Mitchell-Jones AJ, McLeish AP (2004) Bat workers manual, Joint Nature Conservation Committee, 3rd edition.

Bibliographic Citations

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