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mississippibees

Latest version published by Biodiversity Data Journal on Mar 14, 2018 Biodiversity Data Journal

Currently published literature includes 184 species of bees that occur within the state of Mississippi. The geographic ranges of seven additional species are extended into the state of Mississippi: Andrena (Melandrena) obscuripennis Smith, 1853, Anthemurgus passiflorae Robertson, 1902, Dieunomia bolliana (Cockerell, 1910), Diadasia enavata (Cresson, 1872), Peponapis crassidentata (Cockerell, 1949), Triepeolus subnitens Cockerell and Timberlake, 1929, and Brachynomada nimia (Snelling and Rozen, 1987). These records raise the total number of published species known from the state to 191. Anthemurgus and Brachynomada are also genera new to Mississippi.

Data Records

The data in this occurrence resource has been published as a Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A), which is a standardized format for sharing biodiversity data as a set of one or more data tables. The core data table contains 158 records.

This IPT archives the data and thus serves as the data repository. The data and resource metadata are available for download in the downloads section. The versions table lists other versions of the resource that have been made publicly available and allows tracking changes made to the resource over time.

Downloads

Download the latest version of this resource data as a Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A) or the resource metadata as EML or RTF:

Data as a DwC-A file download 158 records in English (8 KB) - Update frequency: unknown
Metadata as an EML file download in English (14 KB)
Metadata as an RTF file download in English (9 KB)

Versions

The table below shows only published versions of the resource that are publicly accessible.

Rights

Researchers should respect the following rights statement:

The publisher and rights holder of this work is Biodiversity Data Journal. To the extent possible under law, the publisher has waived all rights to these data and has dedicated them to the Public Domain (CC0 1.0). Users may copy, modify, distribute and use the work, including for commercial purposes, without restriction.

GBIF Registration

This resource has been registered with GBIF, and assigned the following GBIF UUID: e32779b0-d923-4b84-8a11-a78c13abcad5.  Biodiversity Data Journal publishes this resource, and is itself registered in GBIF as a data publisher endorsed by Participant Node Managers Committee.

Keywords

Bee; Biodiversity; Hymenoptera; Apidae; Andrenidae; Halictidae ; Occurrence; Specimen

Contacts

Who created the resource:

Katherine Parys
Research Entomologist
USDA ARS Southern Insect Management Research Unit 141 Experiment Station Road 38776 Stoneville MS (662) 686-5275
https://www.ars.usda.gov/southeast-area/stoneville-ms/southern-insect-management-research/people/katherine-parys/

Who can answer questions about the resource:

Katherine Parys
Research Entomologist
USDA ARS Southern Insect Management Research Unit 141 Experiment Station Road 38776 Stoneville MS (662) 686-5275
https://www.ars.usda.gov/southeast-area/stoneville-ms/southern-insect-management-research/people/katherine-parys/

Who filled in the metadata:

Harold Ikerd
Database Manager
USDA-ARS POLLINATING INSECTS RESEARCH UNIT 5310 Old Main Hill 84322 Logan Utah US 435-797-2526
https://www.ars.usda.gov/people-locations/person/?person-id=39335

Who else was associated with the resource:

Author
Katherine Parys
Research Entomologist
USDA ARS Southern Insect Management Research Unit 141 Experiment Station Road 38776 Stoneville MS (662) 686-5275
https://www.ars.usda.gov/southeast-area/stoneville-ms/southern-insect-management-research/people/katherine-parys/

Geographic Coverage

The native bee fauna of Mississippi, USA has been historically poorly sampled, but is of particular relevance to determine range limits for species that occur in the southern United States. Additions to the list of native bees known for Mississippi are reported with notes on range, ecology, and resources for identification.

Bounding Coordinates South West [30.107, -91.802], North East [35.317, -87.935]

Taxonomic Coverage

Hymenoptera: Apoidea

Superfamily  Apoidea

Project Data

The native bee fauna of Mississippi is poorly known and sampled, but is of particular relevance to determining range limits of many species (Smith et al. 2012). Mississippi is composed of four distinct ecoregions: the Southeastern Plains, the Mississippi Alluvial Plain, the Mississippi Valley Loess Plains, and the Southern Coastal Plain (Chapman et al. 2004). The majority of the recorded bee species currently known from Mississippi are from Mitchell, who summarized state level distributions across the eastern United States, and recorded 122 species from Mississippi (Mitchell 1960, Mitchell 1962). The majority of the records included therein are those from collections made by Michener in the 1940s near Hattiesburg, MS, in the Southeastern Plains (Michener 1947). Smith et al. (2012) listed 53 more records from the Black Belt Prairies, also part of the Southeastern Plains, while Rightmyer (2008) listed an additional five species in a revisionary study of the cleptoparasite Triepeolus Robertson. An additional series of papers (MacGown and Scheifer 1992, Cane et al. 1996, Colla et al. 2011, Parys et al. 2015) each added singular records, bringing the published total number of species reported from the state of Mississippi to 184. Of the four ecoregions that occur within the state, the Mississippi Alluvial Plain is of particular interest as it is almost completely un-sampled for native bee fauna with the exception of Parys et al. (2015), and is part of the Mississippi Alluvial Valley (MAV) which also includes portions of Arkansas, Louisiana, and Missouri. This region of Mississippi is colloquially referred to as the "Delta" of the state. The MAV is the largest floodplain in the United States, comprising over 10 million hectares of historically bottomland hardwood forest that was seasonally flooded (Frederickson 2005). Today, the majority of the floodplain has been controlled with a system of levees constructed during the twentieth century, allowing the majority of the landscape to be converted to commercial agriculture (Faulkner et al. 2011). Landscapes fragmented by agriculture generally have less biodiversity than those left as natural habitats, though mass flowering crops can influence the densities of generalist pollinators (Westphal et al. 2003, Potts et al. 2010). Baseline data on the presence and distribution of native bee species of these previously unsampled areas across the MAV can inform decision making by land managers, and potentially be used to assess risks from agricultural practices.

Title New records and range extensions of several species of native bees (Hymenoptera: Apoidea) from Mississippi, USA
Study Area Description Collections of bees from a variety of habitats across the Mississippi Delta were made between 2015 and 2017. Locations sampled included commercial agricultural operations, research farms operated by the United State Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service and local universities, and two national wildlife refuges. Commercial farms in the Mississippi Delta typically plant a combination of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.), corn (Zea mays L.), and soybeans (Glycine max (L.) Moench.). Many of the commercial farms also plant smaller fields of sunflowers (Helianthus annuus L.), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.), rice (Oryza sativa L.), and sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam. Collection methods at all of the locations included multiple methods from the following: modified pan traps (blue, yellow, and white "bee bowls"), blue and yellow vane traps, malaise traps, netting, sweeping, and examining bycatch from other collection methods.
Design Description Identifications were completed by the authors using a variety of primary literature (e.g. Cockerell 1910, Mitchell 1960, Mitchell 1962, Snelling and Rozen 1987, Michener 2007, Rightmyer 2008, Ayala and Griswold 2012, Bouseman and LaBerge 1978, Sipes 2001). 

The personnel involved in the project:

Sampling Methods

Collection methods at all of the locations included multiple methods from the following: modified pan traps (blue, yellow, and white "bee bowls"), blue and yellow vane traps, malaise traps, netting, sweeping, and examining bycatch from other collection methods.

Collection Data

Collection Name U.S. National Pollinating Insects Collection
Collection Identifier http://grbio.org/cool/q49p-qw3v
Parent Collection Identifier Not applicable
Specimen preservation methods Pinned

Additional Metadata

Alternative Identifiers http://ipt.pensoft.net/resource?r=mississippibees